Multimedia Encounters: Conference Programme

The UCL Multimedia Anthropology Lab is pleased to invite you to our upcoming online conference and virtual exhibition, Multimedia Encounters: Experimental Approaches to Ethnographic Research. This event will begin next Tuesday 12th January at 17:45 with the following opening programme of keynote speakers. The full conference programme is attached as a PDF.

17:45 – 18:00 | Introduction: Multimedia Encounters
Raffaella Fryer-Moreira (UCL)

18:00 – 19:30 | Opening Panel: Knowledge Otherwise

How can anthropological knowledge be thought otherwise? What might the implications of this be for research practice and communication more broadly? This keynote panel introduces the core themes of the conference by bringing together three contemporary thinkers and the unique ideas that each mobilise in their critical engagements with knowledge.

  • 18:05 | Professor Haidy Geismar (UCL)
  • 18:25 | Dr Ludovic Coupaye (UCL) | The Anthropology of Techniques and the Techniques of Anthropology
  • 18:45 | Kuña Jaqueline Aranduhá (Kuñangue Aty Guasu / UFGD) | Decolonising anthropology: a perspective from Guarani & Kaiowá indigenous women
  • 19:05 | Panel discussion
  • 19:40 – 20:40 | Kuñangue Online: Opening Ceremony

To attend, please register for free on Eventbrite, and joining instructions will be shared on the day.
To stay in the loop, please follow UCL MAL on our social media: FacebookInstagram, and Twitter.
UCL MAL is an interdisciplinary research network that explores innovative methods for conducting and presenting ethnographic research. We have organised several seminar series and exhibitions at UCL and have presented work and ideas at Somerset House, Modern Art Oxford, and the Tate Modern. Founded in 2017 by doctoral research students at UCL Anthropology, today MAL is composed of over 50 members around the world, with representatives from anthropology, art, computer science, sound studies, film, and human rights. MAL has been generously supported by UCL Anthropology, the Institute of Advanced Studies, UCL Grand Challenges, and the British Museum. 

Balkanologie 2020

Nous avons le grand plaisir de vous annoncer que Balkanologie. Revue d’études pluridisciplinaires est de retour !

 Les deux numéros de 2020, vol. 15 n°1 et vol. 15 n°2 sont maintenant en ligne et en accès libre sur la plateforme OpenEdition.

Au nom du Comité de rédaction, nous tenons à vous remercier chaleureusement de votre collaboration

It is a great pleasure to announce that Balkanologie. Revue d’études pluridisciplinaires is back!

The two issues for 2020, vol.15 n°1 and vol.15 n°2 are now available online and free access on the platform OpenEdition.

On behalf of the Editorial Board, we thank you warmly for your collaboration.



Call for Papers: Princeton / Columbia Conference on «The Greek War of Independence and the Americas»

November 12-13, 2021 – Princeton University and Columbia University in the City of New York

Princeton University’s Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies and the Department of History at Columbia University invite scholars at all stages of their careers to submit proposals for individual papers to be given at a two-day international history conference scheduled for Friday to Saturday, November 12-13, 2021. The conference will explore the social, political, cultural, and economic interconnections between the Greek War of Independence and the Americas.

The conference, which participates in global bicentennial celebrations of the outbreak of the Greek War of Independence in 1821, is intended to further historical thinking connecting histories of an age of revolutions on multiple continents. It may lend itself to work in a comparative vein or comparisons may arise through discussion of intensive case studies. The organizers anticipate work that fuels rethinking sovereignty, peoplehood, and a world of nations and empires through actors and processes.

Themes to be explored include models of revolution in the Americas in rethinking the Greek Independence struggle; the liberal international moment of the 1820s in southern Europe and connections with the independence movements in South America; attitudes within Greece towards the Americas and the move to independence in the western hemisphere; questions of republics and slavery composed by African-Americans in 1820s; response to the slavery question in the Morea. Approaches to foreign and economic affairs including intervention and non-intervention policies developed in the Americas, such as the Monroe Doctrine and the policy of states in the Americas toward an independent Greece; the rise of an international market for sovereign debt and the debt boom/bust of the 1820s; economic and technological aspects of American involvement including steamship purchases; the suppression of piracy; the involvement of Protestant missions; the rescue of Greek orphans. Intellectual history and cultural and artistic responses, such as international Benthamism and radical constitutionalism; novel approaches to philhellenes of the Western Hemisphere, including classicizing political thought (e.g., Jefferson, Koraes); and the impact of philhellenism on American life, culture, and institutions (e.g., the cases of Francis Lieber and Samuel Gridley Howe); rethinking American philhellenes in Greece; the circulation of memoirs, journalism, captive and travel literature and the literary representation of the Greek war in the United States; memories of 1821 and Greek-American life over the following century and a half.

The conference is intended to meet over two sequential days, one each at the respective campuses of the hosting institutions.  If the conference is held in person as planned, speakers selected will be provided four nights lodging (2 nights in Princeton, 2 nights in New York City, booked on their behalf) and reimbursement of a fixed amount toward travel expenses. Selected participants should however be prepared for possible changes in the modality of the conference if continuing public health and safety concerns prevail against or limit physical assembly. Health and safety concerns might even dictate a change in the dates of the conference. The organizers commit to making a decision in good time regarding modality.  Speakers should not purchase tickets for travel that are not fully refundable until they are notified by the organizers to do so.  Should the conference be held virtually or in hybrid mode, there will be no reimbursements towards unexecuted travel expenses, and should the conference be held in person on different dates, there be will no reimbursement for travel arrangements made with respect to the original dates.

Deadline for proposals is Monday, February 8, 2021. Applicants should submit an abstract of no longer than 300 words and a one-page summary curriculum vitae to Sara Brooks (sbrooks@princeton.edu), Secretary to the Program Committee.

Program Committee: Dimitri Gondicas (Princeton University); Jeremy Adelman (Princeton University); Natasha Wheatley (Princeton University); Peter Wirzbicki (Princeton University); Mark Mazower (Columbia University); Konstantina Zanou (Columbia University); Kostas Kostis (University of Athens)

Call for Papers – Multimedia Anthropology Lab

CONFERENCE DETAILS & SUBMISSION: https://www.uclmal.com/conferences

How are ethnographic encounters with alterity mediated and transformed by multimedia technologies? Drawing on the insights and questions raised by both material culture studies and the ontological turn, we aim to facilitate a global conversation on the concepts, forms and mediums through which knowledge is produced and shared. This conference is hosted by UCL Multimedia Anthropology Lab, an interdisciplinary research network aimed at developing innovative methods for anthropological practice.

 CONFERENCE THEME: KNOWLEDGE OTHERWISE

Anthropological encounters with others have led us to question ideas previously taken as given. Concepts of family, society, culture, nature, and what it means to be human have all been subject to revision. When these critiques are directed towards knowledge itself, the different ideas people have about what knowledge is and how it is shared have led us to question the theories and practices through which we seek to know. Proponents of the ontological turn (Holbraad & Pedersen 2017) have developed these ideas to call for an anthropological project that is radically experimental, drawing on ethnographic encounters with alterity to critically interrogate the analytical concepts that inform our research.

At the same time, material culture studies has pointed towards the important role of materials in the articulation of human knowledge. The materials through which ethnographic encounters are translated into knowledge – as text, image, sound, performance, simulated sensory immersion, etc – shape the ways in which these encounters are experienced by others, and the conceptual affordances they present. We examine how ethnographic encounters with alterity can disrupt not only the conceptual frameworks of anthropology, but also the material practices through which knowledge is produced and communicated, and explore how anthropological knowledge can be both thought and made otherwise.

These questions are especially pertinent in the context of a global pandemic, which has changed the ways we encounter and communicate with others, disrupting diverse forms of knowing and doing. In parallel to this conference, UCL MAL has initiated a partnership with the Kuñangue Aty Guasu, an annual meeting of Guarani & Kaiowá indigenous women in Brazil, which this year will take place online. The translation of this event into an online format allows us to reflect on the parallels between the knowledge practices of indigenous communities and those of anthropologists, and invites us to consider each as a variant (Maniglier 2016) of the other. If we consider the indigenous meeting as an Other kind of conference, and the conference as an Other kind of indigenous meeting, what can we learn about conferences, indigenous meetings, and knowledge itself?

This conference seeks to explore how knowledge can be cast otherwise, in concept, method, and form. We consider how different concepts of knowledge entail different forms of practice, and how different materials and techniques enable different conceptual encounters. What are the conceptual affordances of multimedia encounters with alterity? What is the relation between sensory experience and conceptual movement? Can encounters with alterity be simulated in VR? Can we do theory through film or sound? How can AI traverse multiple ontologies, and what does that mean for concepts? How can websites, social media, and other digital platforms disseminate research findings? Can research be presented as performance? How can an exhibition be posed as an experiment? What is the concept of the concept?

If we are to seriously question the concepts and methods through which we produce knowledge, then our commitment to being radically experimental must go beyond a critique of analytical tools and extend to a thorough interrogation of the methods and mediums through which research is produced and presented.   

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

UCL MAL invites contributions from academics and practitioners across disciplines who engage with these questions, and experiment with innovative approaches to conducting and presenting research. We welcome submissions in any format (accompanied by a written abstract) and encourage contributors to interpret our theme as broadly as possible. We are particularly interested in contributions which explore the following topics/methods:

VR & 360 VIDEO | IMMERSIVE ENVIRONMENTS | SONIC ETHNOGRAPHY | NET ART | PERFORMANCE | ETHNOGRAPHIC FILM | EXHIBITION AS RESEARCH | PROJECTION MAPPING | SCULPTURE | MULTISENSORY MEDIA | INTERACTIVE INSTALLATION | PHOTOGRAMMETRY | AI & MACHINE LEARNING | DIGITAL ANTHROPOLOGY | & MORE

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words, and any multimedia materials that are relevant to your work, by 23:59 GMT on Wednesday the 2nd of December 2020. Please use the following submission link: www.uclmal.com/conferences  

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME & KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
The conference will take place online on the 12th, 13th & 14th of January 2021, and will be accompanied by an online exhibition of multimedia works. Each day will begin with keynote contributions from academics and practitioners whose theory and practice invite us to think otherwise, followed by thematic panels where experimental research approaches and their implications for theory will be debated in more depth. The following keynote speakers have been confirmed so far:

Ludovic Coupaye | Lecturer in Anthropology | UCL
Haidy Geismar | Professor of Anthropology | UCL
Jaqueline Aranduhá | Guarani & Kaiowá Indigenous Leader

The conference is free to attend, but please register for tickets on Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/multimedia-encounters-experimental-approaches-toethnographic-research-tickets-127591845645  

UCL MULTIMEDIA ANTHROPOLOGY LAB
UCL MALis an interdisciplinary research network that explores innovative methods for conducting and presenting ethnographic research. We have organised several seminar series and exhibitions at UCL and have presented work and ideas at Somerset House, Modern Art Oxford, and the Tate Modern. Founded in 2017 by doctoral research students at UCL Anthropology, today MAL is composed of over 50 members around the world, with representatives from anthropology, art, computer science, sound studies, film, and human rights. MAL has been generously supported by UCL Anthropology, the Institute of Advanced Studies, UCL Grand Challenges, and the British Museum.

If you would like to learn more about MAL or our activities please visit our website at www.uclmal.com or contact us directly at info@uclmal.com.   

 The image above depicts an anthropologist and research assistant sanitising Covid supplies before delivering them to Guarani & Kaiowá indigenous communities in Brazil. The scene, made possible by the presence of a 360 camera, illustrates the hyper-awareness of anthropological encounters in a Covid context and invites us to reflect on the ways in which encounters are mediated – whether by recording technologies, digital tools for remote communication or by PPE.  



PERFORMING NATIONAL IDENTITY: COMMEMORATIONS, INSTITUTIONS, AND RITUALS

Conference for the celebration of the bicentennial of the 1821 Greek Revolution

September 24-26 (new date), 2021, Thessaloniki, Greece

Co-organized by:

Folklore and Ethnological Museum of Macedonia-Thrace
Department of Balkan, Slavic and Oriental Studies, University of Macedonia
Laboratory for the Study of Culture, Borders and Gender, (Department of BSΟS, University of Macedonia)
Department of Music Science and Art, University of Macedonia
Section of Folklore, Department of History and Archaeology, University of Ioannina  

CALL FOR PAPERS

It is common knowledge in the social sciences that collective identities are neither eternal nor fixed. They are fluid, historically shaped, and object of management and negotiation by collective and individual actors. It is also common ground that national identities have been formed during modernity when the nation-state emerged as an essential and dominant political organization unit.

The outset of the relationship between the nation’s collectivity and the state’s territoriality is traced in the historical period of the industrial and urban revolution in Europe. However, this relationship is redefined continuously and shapes, historically, the dominant narrative around national identity, national origin, and the way the nation and the modern collective self are constructed.

In Greece, despite the debates and different perspectives, the view of the pre-existing cultural community of Hellenism is commonly accepted, and it is reconstructed on a new ground after the national liberation struggles and the establishment of the modern Greek state.

The conference explores ways of constructing the community through performative expressions of collective identities, as they become visible in the institutional discourse, public events, rituals, and symbols used by the state and citizens to (re)produce the nation. These are contexts and processes in which experiences of the self, the collective, the national belonging, and the citizen are produced through interactions, hegemonic discourses, experiences of power, symbolic meanings, and embodied practices.

The concept of performance is chosen as the appropriate theoretical and analytical framework to study complex and multilevel forms of social action and different cultural practices that shape, reproduce or even challenge the multiple discourses and embodied ways in which national identity is constructed.

The conference will host presentations (in Greek or English) and discuss the issue of national identity, focusing on institutions’ role and various forms of performance in the context of institutional discourse, social interaction, and various bodily practices. Indicative thematic areas are as follows:

• Collective, state, and private institutions (e.g., educational institutions, museums, associations, cultural associations)

• Religion, rituals, celebrations, and symbols

• Communities, borders and boundaries

• Space, architecture, monuments, and memory

• Family, kinship, and gender

• Material culture, nutritional practices, customary life

• Language, arts, dance, music, songs, costumes, sports

• Technology, media, digital and audiovisual culture

The invitation is aimed at social sciences and humanities researchers (Social Anthropology, Folklore, History, Sociology, Cultural Studies, etc.) who employ case studies and critical thinking to highlight the meanings and limitations, and dynamics of national identity performances in contemporary times.

Submission of applications – Information

• Summary of up to 250 words (in Greek or English) with the title of the presentation

• Contact details: name, scientific status, email address

• Conference languages: Greek, English

Deadline for the abstract submission: November 30, 2020

E-mail: lemmth.vsas.synedrio2021@gmail.com

Eleni Gelani, PhD Candidate in Folklore and Social Anthropology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Scientific Committee

  • Vassilis Nitsiakos, Professor of Social Folklore, University of Ioannina
  • Fotini Tsibiridou, Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Macedonia
  • Eftichia Voutira, Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Macedonia
  • Eleni Gavra, Professor of Housing and Cultural Heritage in the Balkans and the Black Sea, University of Macedonia
  • Alexandra Ioannidou, Professor of Modern and Contemporary Slavic Literatures and Culture, University of Macedonia
  • Eleftheria Deltsou, Associate Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Thessaly
  • Ioannis Manos, Associate Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Macedonia
  • Stavroula – Villy Fotopoulou, Head of the Directorate of Modern Cultural Heritage, Ministry of Culture
  • Marilena Papachristoforou, Associate Professor of Social Anthropology and Folklore, University of Ioannina
  • Eleni Kallimopoulou, Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, University of Macedonia
  • Eleni Sideri, Assistant Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Macedonia
  • Stratos Dordanas, Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary History, University of Macedonia

Organizational committee

  • Vassilis Nitsiakos, Professor of Social Folklore, University of Ioannina
  • Ioannis Manos, Associate Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Macedonia
  • Eleni Kallimopoulou, Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, University of Macedonia
  • Ioannis Drinis, Head of the Department of Intangible Cultural Heritage and Intercultural Affairs, Ministry of Culture
  • Eleftheria Deltsou, Associate Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Thessaly
  • Elina Kapetanaki, Dr. Social Anthropology, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Macedonia
  • Eleni Bintsi, Head of LEMM-TH
  • Eleni Gelani, PhD Candidate in Folklore and Social Anthropology, AUTh.
  • Sotiris Souloukos, PhD Candidate in Religious Studies, AUTh.

Calls for individual grant applications

ENTAN is pleased to announce two calls for individual grant applications which aim to encourage research on non-territorial autonomy (NTA) and minority related issues:
Call for Short Term Scientific Missions (STSM) for scholars who wish to do research at a hosting institution abroad;
Call for ITC conference grants available to researchers from inclusiveness target countries (ITC) who wish to present papers at conferences abroad.Application deadline is 30 August 2020.For updates, please check our website, and follow the work of ENTAN giving your likes on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
Call for ITC conference grants available to researchers from inclusiveness target countries (ITC) who wish to present papers at conferences abroad.
Application deadline is 30 August 2020.
For updates, please check our website, and follow the work of ENTAN giving your likes on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.